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Seminar Details

CHAI Seminars 2013

CHAI Seminar Schedule 2013

Here is the schedule for the Computer Human Adapted Interaction Research Group seminars. They range from formal presentations of mature work by members of the group or visitors to less formal reports of work-in-progress. The regular meeting time is 11:00am Wednesday in the School of IT Building Seminar Room 123.

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Weekly Seminars

Date Location Speaker(s) Topic
Mon 16 December
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Eric McCreath Flipping your class - without flipping out
Mon 09 December
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Rainer Wasinger Innovation and Entrepreneurship within CHAI
Mon 02 December
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Amali Weerasinghe Encouraging Students to do the Right Thing for the Right Reasons: A Study of Adaptive Tutorial Dialogues in Intelligent Tutoring Systems
Mon 18 November
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Debjanee Barua

Christopher James Ackad
OzCHI 2013 Practice Talks on User Control in Long-term User Modelling and Personal Hypotheses for Long-term Health and Well-being

Measuring Interactivity at an Interactive Public Information Display
Mon 04 November
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Roberto Martinez-Maldonado Trip Report from Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces 2013
Mon 21 October
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Petra Ivana Kovacevic Scripted collaboration for knowledge creation
Tue 08 October
11:00AM
School of IT
Level 3W
Couches Area
Alexander Plopski Research Possibilities at Takemura Laboratory: An Exertion of Past and Present Research Projects
Mon 30 September
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Roberto Martinez-Maldonado Shared devices, Collaboration Analytics and Sensing technologies: a way to support learning activities in and out the classroom
Mon 23 September
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Jonathon Twyble Personal Contact Relationship Management
Mon 16 September
12:00PM
School of IT Room 123 Sharon Oviatt Opportunities and Challenges of the New Field of Multimodal Learning Analytics
Wed 11 September
11:00AM
Rm 230
Education bldg
Sharon Oviatt The Impact of Interface Affordances on Human Ideation, Problem-solving and Inferential Reasoning
Mon 02 September
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Fernando Vega Social Robots to foster creativity and logical thinking in Children
Mon 26 August
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Kazjon Grace Interaction Design for Creativity
Mon 12 August
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Judy Kay Trip Report on Learning Analytics Summer Institute
Mon 05 August
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Rainer Wasinger Trip Report from Pervasive Displays 2013
Mon 29 July
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Martin Tomitsch This is Media Architecture
Mon 03 June
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Kalina Yacef From online dating to education: how reciprocal recommender technology can support student group formation
Mon 27 May
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Judy Kay Trip report from CHI 2013
Mon 20 May
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Elise Van den Hoven Materialising Memories: using design to support personal remembering
Mon 13 May
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Andrew Clayphan Go8-C9 Student Leadership in International Co-operation Trip Report
Mon 29 April
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Fabio Ramos Online learning and unsupervised segmentation with affinity propagation and nonparametric classification
Mon 15 April
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 JudyAnne Sharmini

Petra Ivana Kovacevic

Jonathon Twyble
Supporting the Public in Learning to Explore An Information Space at an Interactive Public Display

Scripted collaboration for knowledge creation

Personal CRM Exomem
Mon 08 April
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Luiz Pizzato A Bridge Too Far
Mon 25 March
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Debjanee Barua

Farahnaz Yekeh
Viewing and Controlling Personal Sensor Data: What do Users Want?

Hypothesis evaluation based on ubicomp sensing: moving from researchers to users
Mon 18 March
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Judy Kay New CHAI website review
Mon 11 March
12:00PM
School of IT Room 123 Andrew Clayphan Open Learner Models to Support Reflection on Brainstorming at Interactive Tabletops
Mon 04 March
12:00PM
School of IT Room 123 All CHAI members Semester welcome
Mon 25 February
12:00PM
School of IT Room 123 Summer scholars 2012/2013 Summer Scholars Presentations
Mon 18 February
12:00PM
School of IT Room 124 Gord McCalla The Ecological Approach: A Framework for Supporting Learning and Learning System Design
Mon 11 February
12:00PM
School of IT Room 123 Paul Watson MOVEeCloud: An open cloud platform for Activity Analysis
Fri 11 January
11:00AM
School of IT Meeting area 3W-322 Antonio Krüger Intelligent User Interfaces for the Retail Domain and HCI@DFKI

:: Flipping your class - without flipping out

Speaker:
Eric McCreath

Description:
The traditional approach to teaching has the teacher deliver core content as lectures, after which students go off and complete exercises, labs, assignment, etc. with often little help from, or interaction with, teaching staff or other students. The idea of "flip teaching" is that lecture material is recorded and listened to outside of class, this frees up class time to focus on the more interactive aspects of education.

Given dwindling lecture attendance (students where just watching the lectures at home anyway) this year I flipped my Introduction to Computer Systems class providing student with pre-recorded lecture content and reorganised class time. This talk will summarise the changes I made to the course, overview the tools used, and reflect on the educational outcomes. Overall this has been a positive experience and I plan to refine and continue this teaching approach in coming years.

Speaker Bio:
Eric McCreath completed his Ph.D. in 1999 from the University of New South Wales in machine learning. In 1999 Eric joined the Basser Department of Computer Science (now the School of Information Technologies) at Sydney University and then in 2001 he joined the Department of Computer Science (now the Research School of Computer Science) at the Australian National University. Eric continues to hold a lecturing position at the ANU. Eric has had a number of research interests over the years including looking at how machine learning can be applied to help the organisation of email and the organisation of mobile phone menus. More recently he has focused on Computer System, in particular looking at how to best deploy novel architectures, such as the cell processor or GPUs, for computationally intensive tasks. Eric has an interest and passion for excellence in teaching and in 2011 he was awarded the Dean's Teaching award.

:: Innovation and Entrepreneurship within CHAI

Speaker:
Rainer Wasinger

Description:
This will be an informal presentation on my experience as a researcher moving into the realms of entrepreneurship in Australia. It will present a number of highlights from other talks that I have attended in the recent past, and it will cover topics like the innovation cycle and lean start-up principles. I will describe the startup facilities available to us in Sydney and the different types of funding that startups can seek, and answer any questions that people may have on my experience in the INCUBATE program.

Speaker Bio:
Dr Wasinger works in the Computer Human Adapted Interaction (CHAI) research group at Sydney University, where he is currently involved with the Smart Services CRC project titled "Multi-Channel Content Delivery and Mobile Personalisation". His research interests are in mobile and ubiquitous computing and the cloud-based infrastructures required to support native mobile and web-based applications. Common themes to the past computer systems that he has built include context-awareness, user-modelling, personalisation, content repurposing, and multimodal interaction. This work falls under the broader fields of software engineering, human computer interaction, intelligent user interfaces, ubiquitous computing, user experimentation, and systems design. His past work has also had a strong focus on user-centred design and experimentation, which occurs throughout the design, implementation, and evaluation of these systems. More recently, he has completed the INCUBATE program that is run by Sydney University Union and is now the CEO of a small start-up called Neighbourhood Networks.

:: Encouraging Students to do the Right Thing for the Right Reasons: A Study of Adaptive Tutorial Dialogues in Intelligent Tutoring Systems

Speaker:
Amali Weerasinghe

Description:
Tutorial dialogues have been used as an effective teaching strategy in Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs). A tutorial dialogue is one type of feedback provided by ITSs, and is similar to human tutor-student dialogues in a traditional classroom setting. In this talk, I will discuss the general model developed to support adaptive tutorial dialogues for both well-and ill-defined instructional domains and tasks. I will also present results of one of the studies carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of our model in supporting adaptive tutorial dialogues in conceptual database design. Results of this study revealed that the acquisition of the domain knowledge of the experimental group who received adaptive dialogues was significantly higher than their peers in the control group with non-adaptive dialogues.

Speaker Bio:
Amali Weerasinghe is a Lecturer at the School of Computer Science, University of Adelaide. She received her PhD and MSc degrees from University of Canterbury, New Zealand. Her research focuses on the application of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to education. She conducts research in AI, Human Computer Interaction and Cognitive Science to develop complex educational, interactive systems that provide customized learning environments. She has been a key member in organizing several national and international conferences and workshops including AIED2011 and ICCE2010. In addition she has also severed as a program committee member for numerous international conferences and journals including AIED2013, ICCE 2008-2013, e-Learning 2013 and IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies.

:: OzCHI 2013 Practice Talks on User Control in Long-term User Modelling and Personal Hypotheses for Long-term Health and Well-being

Speaker:
Debjanee Barua

Description:
Debjanee will present 2 talks that she will give for the upcoming OzCHI 2013 (25th Nov-29th Nov) conference in Adelaide, on the topics of "Foundations for Infrastructure and Interfaces to Support User Control in Long-term User Modelling" and "Personal Hypotheses Interfaces to support long-term health and well-being".

The particular details for each talk are:

* Long talk - Foundations for Infrastructure and Interfaces to Support User Control in Long-term User Modelling *

Personal sensors track data about many aspects of our lives. This data can be used to form a long-term user model to help people self reflect on their long-term goals. Yet, there is a dearth of work on designing the infrastructure and associated interfaces so that people can control the data stored in their user models. This is also important as it enable users to use and manipulate their own data as they wish. We have conducted a survey with over 100 participants to gain an understanding of people's attitudes towards controlling their data. This paper presents the design of the survey and reports the results. We explored control issues in terms of three sensors: weight, activity and inactivity . Our results paint a nuanced picture of user preferences. We conclude with implications for designing long-term user modelling systems for user control of personal sensor data.

and

* Short talk - Personal Hypotheses Interfaces to support long-term health and well-being *

Huge amounts of data are becoming available to help people achieve and maintain health and well-being. Many emerging devices for self tracking create the opportunity for people to collect diverse personal data to gain understanding of themselves. For example, activity trackers enable people evaluate their own hypothesis about their health and activity. It is challenging at present to exploit such data effectively and this paper proposes a new class of interface based on personal hypotheses. We conducted a grounded analysis of people's comments about one physical activity tracking device to identify the goals people stated and how they indicated they could achieve them. Our first contribution is the evidence that people do use such devices to evaluate personal hypotheses. Our second contribution is the identification of a core set of such hypotheses. Our third contribution is proposing a new class of interface to help people see their progress on their personal hypotheses and so to use their tracking devices more effectively.

Speaker Bio:
Debjanee Barua is a PhD candidate in School of Information Technologies in University of Sydney. She is working on Lifelong User Modelling project with CHAI research group. Her research aims to explore and develop a framework to support user controlled selective remembering and forgetting in user models. Her research interests: HCI, Ubiquitous and Pervasive computing, User modelling, Machine learning, Datamining.

:: Measuring Interactivity at an Interactive Public Information Display

Speaker:
Christopher James Ackad

Description:
Public Information Displays (PIDs) have only recently begun to support user interaction. Traditionally, such displays have been static and non-interactive, and past research has shown that users of such displays (both non- interactive and interactive) are often oblivious to them; a term commonly known as ‘display blindness’.

Speaker Bio:
Christopher James Ackad is a Ph.D. student with the Computer Human Adapted Interaction Research Group at the University of Sydney, under the direction of Professor Judy Kay. Chris’s research interests include tabletop computing, graphics and user experience design. In 2010, Chris graduated with a degree in Information Technology (Software) with Honours Class 1 from the University of Sydney.

:: Trip Report from Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces 2013

Speaker:
Roberto Martinez-Maldonado

Description:
The community of Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces is changing. This is the fourth occasion I have the opportunity of attending this conference. During this time, I have had chance to understand how a research community evolves and adapts to the changes in the trends of the technology and its applications. This seminar presents an overview of some of the highlights from the conference that took place in St. Andrews, Scotland three weeks ago. I will also present a small reflection about the four last editions of this conference.

Speaker Bio:
Roberto Martinez-Maldonado is a PhD candidate in the Computer Human Adapted Interaction Research Group (CHAI) at the University of Sydney. His current research project focuses on analysing data generated when groups of students collaborate using shared devices to help teachers to be more aware about their learning processes and take informed decisions. He makes use of a number of technologies including multi-touch interactive tabletops, tablets, kinect sensors and databases. More information about his research can be found in http://about.me/RobertoMartinezMaldonado.

:: Scripted collaboration for knowledge creation

Speaker:
Petra Ivana Kovacevic

Description:
In this seminar I will be presenting the work done so far for my thesis on the topic of Scripted Collaboration for Knowledge Creation. For my thesis I explore scripted collaboration, a technique from Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, which provides support regarding the interactive processes during a collaborative activity. The goal of my thesis is to develop a system for collaborative learning that will run on interactive tabletops and incorporate scripting to structure the collaboration process.

Speaker Bio:
Petra Kovacevic is currently undertaking a Master of Professional Engineering (Software) degree at the School of Electrical and Information Engineering. She completed a Bachelor in Computer Science from the University of Zagreb in Croatia.

:: Research Possibilities at Takemura Laboratory: An Exertion of Past and Present Research Projects

Speaker:
Alexander Plopski

Description:
The Takemura Laboratory consists of three research groups, Human-Computer-Interaction, HMD, and Computer Vision for AR. The Takemura Laboratory welcomes multiple foreign research students every year. The students are encouraged to create their own research projects, which would contribute to our aim of improving the interaction and experience while interacting with virtual objects. In todays’ talk past and ongoing projects conducted at the Takemura Laboratory will be presented.

Speaker Bio:
I am a 1st year Ph.D. Student at the Takemura Laboratory at Osaka University, Japan. I received my B.-Sc. Inf. degree in 2010 and my M.-Sc. Inf. degree in 2012 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). As a student I have worked for the AR chair at TUM and METAIO. I was a research student at the Takemura Laboratory in 2011-2012. My research interests are Human Computer Interaction and Computer Vision for Augmented Reality.

:: Shared devices, Collaboration Analytics and Sensing technologies: a way to support learning activities in and out the classroom

Speaker:
Roberto Martinez-Maldonado

Description:
Are interactive tabletops going to make it into the classroom? They feature a series of affordances to support not only small-group collaborative learning but also to enhance teacher's classroom management and awareness. In this talk, firt, I will present an empirical analysis of the effectiveness of designs for the enactment of learning activities in multi-tabletop classrooms. Then, I will present an emerging approach to integrate, from the technological perspective, collaborative learning activities using pervasive and ubiquitous devices for both classroom and distance learning. This approach is based on the concept of orchestration, which portrays the teacher as the main actor for designing, regulating and monitoring student’s learning activities.

Speaker Bio:
Roberto Martinez-Maldonado is a PhD candidate in the Computer Human Adapted Interaction Research Group (CHAI) at the University of Sydney. His current research project focuses on analysing data generated when groups of students collaborate using shared devices to help teachers to be more aware about their learning processes and take informed decisions. He makes use of a number of technologies including multi-touch interactive tabletops, tablets, kinect sensors and databases. More information about his research can be found in http://about.me/RobertoMartinezMaldonado.

:: Personal Contact Relationship Management

Speaker:
Jonathon Twyble

Description:
This talk aims to outline the research conducted and studies undertaken as part of the yearlong honours thesis. The thesis investigates a model of a system that extracts personal relationship information from various data sources including social networks and personal data stores in order to aid users in better understanding and recalling information about the people they communicate with. This system has been termed a Personal Contact Relationship Management System. The thesis evaluates an implementation of the model that utilises email as a data source to extract information about a user’s interactions. Personal information management systems have become essential in managing all the data that an individual can accumulate across their lifetime. However many pieces of information allude our information management systems including information about our personal relationships. If often becomes important to remember how we know someone and what relationship with have with this person. This system will aim to exploit the various amounts of personal data that is stored in email and migrate and order this information into a user model, in order to extract and draw conclusions about users personal interaction information that can be sourced from email.

Speaker Bio:
Jonathon Twyble is a current undergraduate honours student in the CHAI research group. His research is in the area of lifelong user modeling and personal relationship management systems.

:: Opportunities and Challenges of the New Field of Multimodal Learning Analytics

Speaker:
Sharon Oviatt

Description:
Multimodal learning analytics (MMLA) is an emerging field within big data learning analytics. It analyzes natural communication modalities that represent rich multimodal information sources (speech, visual images, digital pen) as students work on learning activities. From an educational viewpoint, MMLA aims to identify domain expertise and consolidation of expertise rapidly, reliably, and objectively. The emergence of MMLA also is compatible with rapid adoption of cell phones with multimodal input capabilities, which now are the dominant educational technology platform worldwide.

From an engineering viewpoint, MMLA provides an opportunity to develop faster, more robust, and more continuous techniques for evaluating students’ learning and the impact of educational technologies and other resources. MMLA aims to achieve predictive power based on high quality data, including coherent patterns available in multimodal information streams, rather than simply large volumes of data. It also aims to combine empirical and machine learning techniques to bootstrap their combined advantages (e.g., transparency, causal inference, consensual metrics).

To support the development of relevant new analysis, modeling, and prediction techniques, MMLA data resources such as the Math Data Corpus have become publicly available to participants in data-driven grand challenge workshop events —such as the upcoming Second Intl. Grand Challenge Workshop on Multimodal Learning Analytics at the ICMI Conference in Sydney on Dec. 9, 2013 (http://icmi.acm.org/2013/). I’ll describe these MMLA data resources, their ground-truth coding, initial research findings and benchmark prediction results, and future studies now in the planning stages. This work represents a collaborative multidisciplinary effort among scientists at Incaa Designs, UCSD, USC, Stanford, and international partners. To conclude, discussion will be encouraged on opportunities, challenges, and implications of MMLA research for both education and computer science.

Speaker Bio:
Sharon Oviatt is internationally known for her extensive work in human-centered interface design, multimodal and mobile interfaces, educational interfaces, and interface design and evaluation. She has been recipient of a National Science Foundation Special Creativity Award for pioneering research, and has published over 140 scientific articles in a wide range of multidisciplinary venues—including a new book on The Design of Future Educational Interfaces (Routledge Press, 2013). She is an Associate Editor of the main journals and edited book collections in the field of human interfaces, including the journal of Human Computer Interaction, ACM Transactions on Intelligent Interactive Systems,mand The Human-Computer Interaction Handbook. She also is the founder of Incaa Designs (http://www.incaadesigns.org/), a Seattle-area nonprofit that researches, designs, and evaluates the impact of new educational interfaces. She was a founder the ACM conference series on Multimodal Interfaces (ICMI), and currently is Co-Chair of ICMI 2013 in Sydney with colleagues Fang Chen (NICTA) and Julien Epps (UNSW).

:: The Impact of Interface Affordances on Human Ideation, Problem-solving and Inferential Reasoning

Speaker:
Sharon Oviatt

Description:
Two studies investigated how computer interface affordances influence basic cognition, including ideational fluency, problem solving, and inferential reasoning. In one study comparing interfaces with different input capabilities, students expressed 56% more nonlinguistic representations (diagrams, symbols, numbers) when using pen interfaces. A linear regression confirmed that nonlinguistic communication directly mediated a substantial increase (38.5%) in students’ ability to produce appropriate science ideas. In contrast, students expressed 41% more linguistic content when using a keyboard-based interface, which mediated a drop in science ideation. A follow-up study pursued the question of how interfaces that prime nonlinguistic communication so effectively facilitate cognition. This study examined the relation between students’ expression of nonlinguistic representations and their inference accuracy when using analogous digital and non-digital pen tools. Perhaps surprisingly, the digital pen interface stimulated construction of more diagrams, more correct Venn diagrams, and more accurate domain inferences. Students’ construction of multiple diagrams to represent a problem also directly suppressed overgeneralization errors, the most common inference failure. These research results reveal that computer interfaces have communications affordances, which elicit communication patterns that can substantially stimulate or impede basic cognition. Implications are discussed for designing new digital tools for thinking, with an emphasis on nonlinguistic and especially spatial representations that are most poorly supported by current keyboard-based Interfaces.

Speaker Bio:
Sharon Oviatt is internationally known for her extensive work in human-centered interface design, multimodal and mobile interfaces, educational interfaces, and interface design and evaluation. She has been recipient of a National Science Foundation Special Creativity Award for pioneering research, and has published over 140 scientific articles in a wide range of multidisciplinary venues—including a new book on The Design of Future Educational Interfaces (Routledge Press, 2013). She is an Associate Editor of the main journals and edited book collections in the field of human interfaces, including the journal of Human Computer Interaction, ACM Transactions on Intelligent Interactive Systems, and The Human-Computer Interaction Handbook. She also is the founder of Incaa Designs (http://www.incaadesigns.org/), a Seattle-area nonprofit that researches, designs, and evaluates the impact of new educational interfaces. She was a founder the ACM conference series on Multimodal Interfaces (ICMI), and currently is Co-Chair of ICMI 2013 in Sydney with colleagues Fang Chen (NICTA) and Julien Epps (UNSW).

:: Social Robots to foster creativity and logical thinking in Children

Speaker:
Fernando Vega

Description:
What’s the difference between a conventional robot and Weaver? The principle of the simplicity, the former one simply avoids it. Weaver is the social robot that is designed to engage children in computer science, technologies and robotics. With an array of sensors and a user-friendly interface any child can engage Weaver to complete a string of challenging entertaining activities that foster creativity and logical thinking. As such, Weaver is a blank canvas that children are able to customize and program to weave their very own ideas. Under such philosophy, Weaver is compatible with any Wi-Fi device while its magical interface is displayed through a web browser whereas not additional software installations are required. Further, by using intuitive gestures Weaver can be controlled, and, in conjunction with either its drag-and-drop programming interface or its Python language compiler, commands can be programmed. Likewise, the childproof skeleton of Weaver and its minimalistic shape allows children to create their own creative shells and add-ons as a complement of their revolutionary robotic idea.

Speaker Bio:
Fernando Vega is working to build robots that he hopes will inspire children to take an interest in the technological possibilities of the future while promoting workshops to engage children in robotics and entrepreneurship. He received a B.Sc. degree in Mechatronics Engineering at the University Nueva Granada, Colombia, in 2009, and has concluded a Master of Commerce degree at the University of Sydney. Fernando also earned a place in the finals of the NSW International Student of the Year Awards 2013; nominated by the Business School because his work with Aboriginal Children in Wilcannia and small businesses in Broken Hill. He is the founder of VMD S.A.S, a company that develops mechatronic devices as tools to create responsible and sustainable environments.

:: Interaction Design for Creativity

Speaker:
Kazjon Grace

Description:
This talk is an introduction to three projects underway in the InDe Lab. The first explores the impact of tangible interfaces on child creativity, and the second is an investigation of how contributing to the design of a citizen science platform affects user motivation. The final project develops a computational framework for evaluating the creativity of artefacts based on how surprising, novel and valuable they are.

Speaker Bio:
Dr. Kaz Grace is a post-doctoral researcher at the InDe Lab of the School of Software and Information Systems at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. His focus is on how interactive and intelligent systems can be used to augment the creativity of their users. He completed his PhD in computational analogy-making at the Faculty of Architecture at Sydney University in 2011 and was a post-doctoral researcher at CHAI until October 2012.

:: Trip Report on Learning Analytics Summer Institute

Speaker:
Judy Kay

Description:
LASI http://www.solaresearch.org/events/lasi/ brought together a diverse group of people who are working on the emerging field of Learning Analytics. It was a remarkable and exciting event that ran for 5 days of intensive sessions that shared diverse perspectives.

Speaker Bio:
Judy Kay is Professor of Computer Science and leads the CHAI: Computer Human Adapted Interaction Research Group. Her research aims to create new technologies for human computer interaction (HCI). This institute links to her research related to learning contexts, particularly her work that has created interfaces for Open Learner Models that make a learner's personal data available in useful forms for long term learning and self-monitoring.Kay was invited to attend LASI to share that work.

:: Trip Report from Pervasive Displays 2013

Speaker:
Rainer Wasinger

Description:
As digital displays become pervasive, they become increasingly relevant in many areas, including advertising, art, sociology, engineering, computer science, interaction design, and entertainment. The International Symposium on Pervasive Displays covers cutting-edge research in the broad spectrum of pervasive digital displays, from large interactive walls to personal projection, from tablets and mobile phone screens to 3-D displays and tabletops. This seminar presents an overview of some of the highlights from the conference that took place in June, 2013 at Mountain View, California.

Speaker Bio:

Dr Wasinger works in the Computer Human Adapted Interaction (CHAI) research group at Sydney University, where he is currently involved with the Smart Services CRC project titled "Multi-Channel Content Delivery and Mobile Personalisation". His research interests are in mobile and ubiquitous computing and the cloud-based infrastructures required to support native mobile and web-based applications. Common themes to the past computer systems that he has built include context-awareness, user-modelling, personalisation, content repurposing, and multimodal interaction. This work falls under the broader fields of software engineering, human computer interaction, intelligent user interfaces, ubiquitous computing, user experimentation, and systems design. His past work has also had a strong focus on user-centred design and experimentation, which occurs throughout the design, implementation, and evaluation of these systems.

:: This is Media Architecture

Speaker:
Martin Tomitsch

Description:
In this talk I will discuss my work with the Media Architecture Institute (www.mediaarchitecture.org/), including our recent book publication "New Media Facades: A Global Survey" (avedition). The talk will highlight human-computer interaction challenges regarding the design of media architecture interfaces and provide an overview of the various underlying disciplines and their contributions to media architecture.

Speaker Bio:
Dr Martin Tomitsch is a Lecturer in the Faculty of Architecture, Design & Planning at the the University of Sydney and Director of the Design Computing program. He is a research member of the Design Lab, research associate at CHAI, honorary research fellow at the Vienna University of Technology's Research Group for Industrial Software (INSO), and founding member at the Media Architecture Institute (MAI).

:: From online dating to education: how reciprocal recommender technology can support student group formation

Speaker:
Kalina Yacef

Description:
Collaborative learning has well recognised benefits for learners, but how can we match students in pairs or small groups to optimise these benefits? I will present how our reciprocal recommender technology, which we created for online dating, can be adapted for an educational context to pair students in an optimal and scalable way.

Speaker Bio:
Kalina Yacef is Senior Lecturer at the School of Information Technologies of the University of Sydney and principal in the CHAI (Computer Human Adapted Interaction) research group. Her academic background consists of a Mathematics B.Sc. (1986), a Masters in Computer Science /Artificial Intelligence (1989) and a PhD in Computer Science (1999) from the University of Paris V, France. Her research focus on Educational Data Mining, with a particular emphasis on supporting collaborative learning and large classroom teaching. She is the Editor of the Journal of Educational Data Mining and co-program chair of the conference on Artificial Intelligence in Education, 2013.

:: Trip report from CHI 2013

Speaker:
Judy Kay

Description:
CHI is the premier conference in Human Computer Interaction. This trip report will provide an overview of some of the papers that are of most interest to our group in the areas of tabletop and surface interaction as well as lifelong user modelling.

Speaker Bio:
Judy Kay is Professor of Computer Science and leads the CHAI: Computer Human Adapted Interaction Research Group. Her research aims to create new technologies for human computer interaction (HCI). Her personalisation research has created the Personis user modelling framework. This is a unified mechanism for keeping and managing people's long term personal data from diverse sources. This is the foundation for building personalised systems. Personis models are distinctive in that they were designed to be scrutable, because interfaces enable the user to scrutinise their user model and personalisation processes based on it. In learning contexts, she has created interfaces for Open Learner Models that make this personal data available in useful forms for long term learning and self-monitoring.

Her interface research has created the Cruiser Natural User Interaction (NIU) software framework. This provides new ways for people to make use of large interactive tabletops and wall displays. By mining the digital footprints of such interaction, this research is creating new ways for people to learn to collaborate, and to learn and work more collaboratively.

:: Materialising Memories: using design to support personal remembering

Speaker:
Elise Van den Hoven

Description:
Personal remembering can be heavily influenced by external factors, such as people, locations and things. These things can be physical, digital or a combination of both, such as digital photographs displayed on a physical screen. Together these media and media carriers can act as memory cues, which in turn can be purposefully created for the support of remembering experiences. The aim of this presentation is to show the potential of this new multidisciplinary research area, combining design, psychology and technology, and which I refer to as Materialising Memories. I will illustrate my design research through the presentation of design case studies.

Speaker Bio:
Elise van den Hoven studied Biology (MSc) at Utrecht University, with a focus on perception research (including internships on human stereovision, auditory masking and rhythm in speech). She continued working on perception while studying Human-Computer Interaction (MTD). Her final project coincided with her PhD project, which was centered around tangible interaction (giving physical form to digital data) for recollecting personal memories in the home (see books for her PhD-thesis, 2004). Her PhD-project took place at Philips Research Laboratories Eindhoven.

Since 2012 Elise works as an associate professor in the School of Design, headed by prof. Lawrence Wallen, in the Design, Architecture & Building faculty of the University of Technology, Sydney in Australia.

Since 2003 Elise works as an assistant professor in the User-Centered Engineering group, headed by prof. Berry Eggen, in the Industrial Design department of the Eindhoven University of Technology in The Netherlands. She has taught several courses at both Bachelor and Master level, e.g. Foundations of Tangible Interaction, Design for Embodied Interaction, User Testing, Tacile Experience, User Research Methods and User Focus and Perspective Basics.

Over the years she supervised numerous students from a.o. Industrial Design (Bachelor, Master and PhD), Human-Technology Interaction (Master), Psychology (Master) and User-System Interaction (2-year PhD).

Her organizational experience includes being on the TEI-steering committee (chair per TEI'13, together with prof. Ali Mazalek), organizing conferences (a.o. TEI08, TEI07 and Persuasive06) and being on program or reviewing committees (a.o. PUC, IJHCS, HCI, CHI, TEI and Interact).

Elise was chair of the WISE-network (Women In Science Eindhoven-network), member of the TU/e Stuurgroep Vrouwelijk Talent naar de Top, initiator of the TU/e mentoring system and initiating member of the MADe network (Music Art Design experiences).

In 2011-2012 Elise was involved in the Intelligent Lighting Institute of the TU/e as the program manager of the research program No Switches Allowed, which focuses on innovative interaction styles with light and lighting.

The research interests of Elise are in (user-centered) designing and evaluating interactive products, with a specific focus on the approach of tangible interaction and the application area of supporting personal remembering.

She collaborates with several colleagues world-wide on these forementioned topics. This also resulted in visiting scientist positions at: * the Synaesthetic Media Lab, GVU (Graphics, Visualization & Usability Center), GeorgiaTech, Atlanta, headed by a/prof. Ali Mazalek. * the Memoir project, University of Sheffield, headed by prof. Steve Whittaker and also collaborating with dr. Daniela Petrelli. * the Interactivation Studio, DAB (Design, Architecture & Building), University of Technology, Sydney, headed by a/prof. Bert Bongers

:: Go8-C9 Student Leadership in International Co-operation Trip Report

Speaker:
Andrew Clayphan

Description:
The Student Leadership in International Co-operation (SLIC) Project focused on looking effective policies for promoting the outbound mobility of Australian students to China and other Asian countries.

At this CHAI Seminar, Andrew will give a report of his recent trip to China, which included visiting four of the nine top Chinese universities - Peking and Tsignhua University in Beijing, The Harbin Institute of Technology in Harbin and Zhejiang University in Hangzhou. His report will cover experiences encountered, opportunities discovered, challenges faced and some recommendations that were made to The Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education (DIICCSRTE).

The scholarship was generously provided by the Go8/DICCSRTE.

Speaker Bio:
Andrew Clayphan is currently doing his PhD with the CHAI Group at the University of Sydney.

:: Online learning and unsupervised segmentation with affinity propagation and nonparametric classification

Speaker:
Fabio Ramos

Description:
The real-time and continuous learning requirements in long-term autonomy pose a number of algorithmic challenges for machine learning. How to keep the computational cost bounded over extensive periods of time? How to adapt the models to new environments and unseen data? How to use the interaction of the robot with the environment to self supervise as much as possible? In this talk, I will present two methods for unsupervised and self supervised learning. The first is based on extensions of affinity propagation; a message passing approach to clustering that can determine the number of clusters, can be adapted to online settings, and is scalable to large datasets. I will show applications to obstacle learning, object clustering and multi-sensor segmentation. The second method is a nonparametric classifier to segment dynamic objects in videos from a moving camera. The algorithm is totally unsupervised and improves its performance with more data, providing a library of segmented dynamic objects (such as cars, people, bikes).

Speaker Bio:
Fabio Ramos is a Senior Lecturer in machine learning and robotics at the School of Information Technologies, University of Sydney, and an ARC Discovery Early Career Fellow. He received the B.Sc. and the M.Sc. degrees in Mechatronics Engineering at University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2001 and 2003 respectively, and the Ph.D. degree at University of Sydney, Australia, in 2007. He has over 80 peer-reviewed publications and received the Best Paper Award at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS) and at the Australian Conference on Robotics and Automation (ACRA). His research focuses on statistical machine learning for large-scale data fusion problems with applications to robotics, mining, environmental monitoring and healthcare.

:: Supporting the Public in Learning to Explore An Information Space at an Interactive Public Display

Speaker:
JudyAnne Sharmini

Description:
Interactive digital displays are becoming increasingly common in public spaces. However, studies indicate these displays are underutilized despite being accessible and deployed in areas with high human traffic. One of the reasons for this could be the absence of a standard interaction mechanism that can be associated with interactive digital displays. As a result, my project aims to explore different ways to support users who wish to explore an information space at an interactive public display. The effectiveness of the proposed strategies would be evaluated by conducting studies to compare learnability and user satisfaction.

Speaker Bio:
JudyAnne Sharmini is currently working on a project that aims to support the public in learning to explore an information space at an interactive public display. She is attached to the Computer Human Adapted Interaction (CHAI) research group and is working under the supervision of Professor Judy Kay. She completed her Bachelors in Computer Science at University Malaya before pursuing a MIT program at the School of Information Technology in The University of Sydney.

:: Scripted collaboration for knowledge creation

Speaker:
Petra Ivana Kovacevic

Description:
In this seminar I will be presenting my thesis topic on Scripted Collaboration for Knowledge Creation. Collaborative learning creates an environment where peers can share knowledge, different perspectives, justify and defend their ideas and build deeper knowledge. However, research has proven that learners often do not collaborate well spontaneously and need additional support to help guide the collaborative process. We explore scripted collaboration, a technique from Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, which should provide support regarding the interactive processes between the collaborators. Collaboration scripts structure the process of collaborative learning by specifying roles and activities to be carries out by the collaborators. The goal of my thesis is to develop a system for collaborative learning that will run on interactive tabletops and whiteboards and incorporate scripting to structure the collaboration process.

Speaker Bio:
Petra Kovacevic is currently undertaking a Master of Professional Engineering (Software) degree at the School of Electrical and Information Engineering. She completed a Bachelor in Computer Science from the University of Zagreb in Croatia.

:: Personal CRM Exomem

Speaker:
Jonathon Twyble

Description:
This talk aims to overview the research that will be conducted over the year as part of the honours program. The thesis will investigate a system to extract personal relationship information from email in order to aid users in better understanding and recalling information about the people they communicate with. This system can be referred to as a Personal CRM. Personal information management systems have become essential in managing all the data that an individual can accumulate across their lifetime. However many pieces of information allude our information management systems including information about our personal relationships. If often becomes important to remember how we know someone and what relationship with have with this person. This system will aim to exploit the various amounts of personal data that is stored in email and migrate and order this information into a user model, in order to extract and draw conclusions about users personal interaction information that can be sourced from email.

Speaker Bio:
Jonathon Twyble is a current undergraduate honours student in the CHAI research group. His research is in the area of lifelong user modeling and personal relationship management.

:: A Bridge Too Far

Speaker:
Luiz Pizzato

Description:
In this seminar I will discuss the influence of location on the decisions of online dating users. I will show how how far online dating users are willing to travel for a date, as well as I will discuss some current work on identifying location-based prejudice.

:: Viewing and Controlling Personal Sensor Data: What do Users Want?

Speaker:
Debjanee Barua

Description:
This is a practice talk of a paper that will be presented in Persuasive, 2013. This paper presents some results of a recent survey and design implications for user control over personal data in pervasive-persuasive systems. Personal data from diverse sensors plays a key role in persuasive systems, especially those aiming to help people achieve long term goals. We need to gain an understanding of the ways people would like to capture and manage such data. We report the design and outcomes of a study exploring how people want to keep and control sensor data for long term health goals. We asked about three sensors, for weight, activity and sitting. We chose these for their diversity in terms of tracking progress on means and end goals, short and long term goals and differing sensitivity of the data. Our results show that people want to use and control a personal copy of such data and their preferences vary across different sensors. This points to the need for future persuasive systems to support these forms of user control over their sensor data.

Speaker Bio:
Debjanee Barua is a PhD student in School of Information Technology in University of Sydney. She is working on Lifelong User Modelling project with CHAI research group. Her research interest spans various areas in computer science including pervasive computing, user modelling, human-computer interaction and datamining. She completed her Bachelors in Computer Science and Engineering from Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET). Before starting her PhD, she worked as a Junior Lecturer in School of Engineering and Computer Science in Independent University Bangladesh.

:: Hypothesis evaluation based on ubicomp sensing: moving from researchers to users

Speaker:
Farahnaz Yekeh

Description:
Emerging pervasive sensing technology provides new ways to create persuasive systems that can help people to achieve their long term goals, such as improve their health. Much persuasive computing research has involved the exploration of researchers' hypotheses about the ways that such ubicomp sensing can help them to achieve these goals. Our work aims to enable individual users to test their personal hypotheses about how their actions, as tracked by ubicomp sensors, and the interface tools that they elect to use, actually impact their goals. We define personal hypothesis and propose an infrastructure and potential interfaces for a new persuasive system to support personal health hypothesis evaluation.

Speaker Bio:
Farahnaz Yekeh is a current PhD student in the CHAI Research Group. Her research is on Lifelong scrutable user models for personal hypothesis testing.

:: New CHAI website review

Speaker:
Judy Kay

Description:
The CHAI website is undergoing a major design change. In this week, we will review and discuss these changes. We also encourage all CHAI members to update their information in the website prior to the meeting.

:: Open Learner Models to Support Reflection on Brainstorming at Interactive Tabletops

Speaker:
Andrew Clayphan

Description:
Brainstorming is a valuable and widely-used group technique to enhance creativity. Interactive tabletops have the potential to support brainstorming and, by exploiting learners' trace data, they can provide Open Learner Models (OLMs) to support reflection on a brainstorming session. In this seminar I will explore our recent work on designing such OLMs to enable individuals to understand their contributions within our scripted brainstorming system, and the potential next phase of this work.

Speaker Bio:
Andrew Clayphan is a current PhD student in the CHAI Research Group. His current work involves interactive tabletops, collaboration scripts and creating models to better understand processes.

:: Semester welcome

Speaker:
All CHAI members

Description:
This week's CHAI seminar is a welcome to the new year and semester to all CHAI members. It is also an opportunity for everyone in the group to say hi and revise their CHAI profile. For this, everyone will speak for 1 or 2 minutes while having their CHAI profile as their "slide". Please have a look at your profile before hand and update it accordingly.

We will also take this opportunity to have a healthy lunch together and weather permitting we might have a guided walk of the campus for our new members.

:: Summer Scholars Presentations

Speaker:
Summer scholars 2012/2013

Description:
This week's CHAI seminar will include a number of 5-minute dry-run presentations by the summer scholars in preparation for the 2013 Summer Scholarship Industry Presentation and Poster Session on Thursday the 28th.

The presenters and their projects are:

* Tom Ryan: Voice-controlled Personal Concierge

* Chong Gao: Multi-channel Curator

* Hangfei Tao: Personalised news recommendations and visualisation

* Elliot Diebold: Investigation to Support Massive Open Online Courses

* Ren Zhu:Revisiting the Content for Prow Project and Interaction Cue Study

* Luke Manning and Justin Wong: The Validity of Smartphone Accelerometer Measurements to Assess Physical Activity Patterns among Adults

:: The Ecological Approach: A Framework for Supporting Learning and Learning System Design

Speaker:
Gord McCalla

Description:
This talk will overview my evolving perspectives on the design of environments to support learning. The basic philosophy is that such environments must be deeply aware of the surrounding context of learning – technical, personal, social, and cultural – and must be adaptive to differences in this context. This philosophy has led to the development of a framework for supporting learning called the ecological approach that allows a learning system to naturally evolve and change as the learning context changes. The talk will present past and current research related to ecological systems. But it will also look forward to possible future applications including the development of simulated learning environments for testing various learning system architectures and the creation of a lifelong learning companion.

Speaker Bio:
Gord McCalla is a Professor of Computer Science and Director of the ARIES Laboratory at the University of Saskatchewan in Canada. His research interests are focussed in the overlapping areas of artificial intelligence in education (AIED) and user modelling, adaptation, and personalization (UMAP). Over the years, with colleagues and graduate students in the ARIES laboratory, he has made many research contributions to both AIED and UMAP in areas such as pedagogical planning, granularity-based diagnosis, peer help systems, pedagogical agents, active learner modelling, educational recommender systems, and educational data mining. He has also been an active member of both the AIED and UMAP research communities, including being president of the AIED Society, serving as program co-chair of both the AIED and UMAP conferences, and serving on the editorial boards of both the AIED and UMUAI journals.

:: MOVEeCloud: An open cloud platform for Activity Analysis

Speaker:
Paul Watson

Description:
Physical activity and sleep are fundamental to health and wellbeing. Low daily energy expenditure, associated with frequent bouts of inactivity, and inadequate sleep are associated with the development of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Unfortunately, measuring people’s activity outside of laboratory environments has been a problem.

We have been exploring new methods of measuring physical activity and sleep, in particular through the use of wrist-worn accelerometers. The computing requirements are challenging as the system must scale to store and analyse vast quantities of data, collected from large populations of users. To address these needs, we have designed and deployed a cloud-based system - MOVEeCloud - for the storage and analysis of data. This is based on e-Science Central - a portable, scalable, secure cloud platform which is currently supporting over AUS$30M of research projects. MOVEeCloud is an open platform that aims to the encourage sharing of data and analysis routines amongst researchers. It is currently being extended to support study management.

The talk will explain how the challenges of large-scale activity analysis, and supporting collaboration between scientists, have been addressed through the design of MOVEeCloud.

MOVEeCloud is a collaboration with Professor Mike Trenell, Director of Director of MoveLab & NIHR Senior Research Fellow at Newcastle University, UK. The work described in the talk is supported by grants from the Research Councils UK, the European Union, Microsoft and Red Hat.

Speaker Bio:
Paul Watson is Professor of Computer Science and Director of the Digital Institute at Newcastle University, UK. There he leads a range of projects that design and exploit cloud computing solutions, including the AUS$20M “Social Inclusion through the Digital Economy” research hub (SiDE) which is investigating how advanced technologies can be used to improve the lives of those from vulnerable groups including older people, disabled people, and marginalised youth. His current research is focussed around the high-level "e-Science Central" cloud platform. Professor Watson joined Newcastle University from industry (ICL High Performance Systems) where he designed scalable database systems. He is a Chartered Engineer, a Fellow of the British Computer Society, and a member of the UK Computing Research Committee.

:: Intelligent User Interfaces for the Retail Domain and HCI@DFKI

Speaker:
Antonio Krüger

Description:
In the Innovative Retail Laboratory (IRL) we develop and conduct tests in a large number of different fields all connected to intelligent shopping consultants. The IRL is an application-oriented research laboratory of the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), which was installed in the head office of the German chain store GLOBUS SB-Warenhaus Holding in St. Wendel. One part of this research is the development of intelligent user interfaces in such an instrumented retail environment. In this talk I would like to highlight a few examples for various types of User Interfaces ranging from mobile AR applications to instrument shopping trolleys. More: http://www.innovative-retail.de/

The talk concludes with some further examples from recent HCI Research conducted at DFKI.

Speaker Bio:
Antonio Krüger received a diploma in computer science and economics at Saarland University in 1995. Afterwards he joined the Cognitive Science Graduate Programme of the same University and finished it with a doctoral degree in 1999. His doctoral thesis was on the "Automated Abstraction of 3D-Graphics". He was early involved in several Artificial Intelligence projects at the German Research Centre for AI (DFKI GmbH), and later from 1999-2003 at the Intelligent Systems Lab of Saarland University as a Senior Researcher. In 2000 he co-founded the University spin-off Eyeled GmbH, a company focusing on mobile computing solutions. Within the company he is responsible for the technology transfer of university research. From 2004 to 2009 he was an associate professor for Geoinformatics and Computer Science at Münster University, Germany. From 2005 to 2009 he was the managing director of the institute for Geoinformatics at the same University. Since 2009 Antonio Krüger is a full professor for Computer Science at Saarland University. At the same time he has been appointed as the Scientific Director of the Innovative Retail Laboratory at the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI) in Saarbrücken, Germany.

Antonio's main research areas are Intelligent User Interfaces and mobile and ubiquitous context-aware Systems.

He worked on the automatic generation of graphics for technical documentations, intelligent navigation systems and personalized media generation. In this context he looked at generation processes that take into account both the limited technical resources of output devices and the limited cognitive resources of the users. More recent examples of his research come from the domain of mobile and ubiquitous computing. Here, Antonio is involved in projects on novel mobile user interfaces, interactive aware surfaces and interaction with large scale displays.


Past Seminars